Manual In Search Of Sustainable Water Management: International Lessons For The American West And Beyond

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online In Search Of Sustainable Water Management: International Lessons For The American West And Beyond file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with In Search Of Sustainable Water Management: International Lessons For The American West And Beyond book. Happy reading In Search Of Sustainable Water Management: International Lessons For The American West And Beyond Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF In Search Of Sustainable Water Management: International Lessons For The American West And Beyond at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF In Search Of Sustainable Water Management: International Lessons For The American West And Beyond Pocket Guide.

Each plant has 15 or more tillers, or stalks, and the grains hang heavy from them. The Thai farmer says this will be his best-ever harvest in 30 years and he will reap it four weeks earlier than usual. It is very different on the other side of the field. Here, Junpeng planted his rice in closely spaced clumps of 20 or more seedlings in shallow water just as he, his father and millions of other small farmers across south-east Asia have always done.

He used the same seeds but the conventionally grown plants are wind-battered and thin, and clearly have fewer, smaller grains. Giving plants more oxygen, minimising the competition between them and strictly controlling the water they receive is thought to make them stronger and more resilient to flood and drought.


  • Botulinum Toxin in Aesthetic Medicine.
  • SEAS Faculty.
  • First: Reduce.
  • Brugada Syndrome - A Bibliography and Dictionary for Physicians, Patients, and Genome Researchers.
  • Community-Based Conservation of Natural Resources.
  • C++ by Example.

When it was first employed outside Madagascar in , the system of rice intensification SRI was dismissed by a handful of scientists who questioned the legitimacy of the reported increased yields. But since then, it has evolved and been developed by peasant farmers working in many different climates around the world. Academic criticism has since all but disappeared and the SRI system of farming has been validated in hundreds of scientific papers and adopted by up to 20 million farmers in 61 countries, according to the SRI information centre in Cornell University.

The miracle method for sustainable rice – and bigger harvests

Vietnamese, Cambodian, Nepalese, Filipino, Indian and African farmers have all reported large increases. In , a young Indian farmer broke the world record for rice production, harvesting 22 tonnes from a single hectare 2.


  • SEAS Faculty | University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability.
  • Docuseek | Chasing Water?
  • Complex variables. Introduction and applications.
  • Historical Dictionary of Polish Cinema.

It uses fewer seed and fertilisers and needs less water. They see the advantages and they change. The Thai farmers who took part in the Ubon Ratchathani trial say they are delighted. I will use the extra money to invest in a tractor.

Community-Based Conservation of Natural Resources | U.S. Department of the Interior

If I can do it, anyone can. Everyone can come and learn. Systems studied include alternative vehicle technology, renewable energy systems such as wind farms, photovoltaics and willow biomass electricity, buildings and infrastructure, information technology, food and agricultural systems, household appliances, and packaging alternatives. Maria Carmen Lemos' broad research interests are related to climate adaptation and the role of knowledge in building adaptive capacity. She is particularly interested in understanding: a the co-production of science and decision-making and the creation of actionable knowledge; b the intersection between development and climate, especially concerning the relationship between anti-poverty programs and risk management; c the use of climate information in building adaptive capacity in different sectors e.

He is particularly interested in understanding how engaging with computation and data can transform the design process as well as inform decision making by stakeholders. Mark conducts empirical research with the aim of providing an evidence base to support the design and planning of environments that perform ecologically, socially and culturally for more sustainable outcomes. His research and teaching interests include environmental information disclosure and greenwash; corporate environmental strategy; environmental NGOs; voluntary environmental agreements; government regulation of business; industrial organization; and energy and the environment.

Professor Miller's research uses life cycle assessment and scenario modeling to identify environmental problems before they occur. Historically, our society has taken a reactionary approach to the environment. By proactively understanding the environmental issues of emerging technologies, we can identify a greater number of options and more creative solutions to avoid or reduce negative consequences. He is a founder of the Environmental Justice Program at the University of Michigan and a major contributor to the growing body of quantitative research examining disproportionate environmental burdens and their impacts on low income and people of color communities.

In , he co-organized with Dr. Environmental Protection Agency as one of two events bringing the issue of Environmental Justice to the attention of the Agency. His current research involves national level studies examining the causes of environmental disparities and the role environmental factors play in accounting for racial and socioeconomic disparities in health.

Through a grant from the Kresge Foundation, he is also examining pollution burdens around public schools and the links between such burdens and student performance and health. Environmental Protection Agency Professor Mohai has provided testimony on environmental justice to the U. House of Representatives in and , the U. Senate in , and the Michigan Civil Rights Commission in Michael Moore's teaching involves courses in microeconomics, environmental economics, and ecosystem services. His research interests include water resource economics and environmental economics.

She develops and tests ecological designs for their cultural sustainability in human-dominated landscapes, with a long-time emphasis on watershed and water infrastructure design and management. Her teaching and research apply this approach to metropolitan and agricultural landscapes — ranging from continental scale implications of agricultural practices to neighborhood scale implications of green stormwater infrastructure.

Joshua Newell is an assistant professor in the School for Environment and Sustainability at the University of Michigan. He is a broadly trained human-environment geographer, whose research focuses on questions related to urban sustainability, resource consumption, and environmental and social justice. The first, Urban Infrastructure and Form , focuses on structural features of the urban form e. The second research area, Urban Consumption and Commodities , focuses on the interrelationships between the consumption of consumer products, our responsibilities as global 'green' urban citizens, and the role of governance mechanisms and frameworks including local institutions in regulating product consumption.

His research approach is often multi-scalar and integrative and, in addition to theory and method found in geography and urban planning, he draws upon principles and tools of industrial ecology, and spatial analysis. He also leads a year-long interdisciplinary PhD student workshop that grapples with theories and concepts of urbanism, sustainability, and resilience. Professor Overpeck is an interdisciplinary climate scientist and the Samuel A. Other awards include the US Dept. He has active climate research programs on five continents, focused on understanding drought and megadrought dynamics and risk the world over, and has also served as the lead investigator of Climate Assessment for the Southwest and the SW Climate Science Center — two major programs focused on regional climate adaptation.

Overpeck also works more broadly on climate and paleoclimate dynamics, ice sheets and sea level, climate-vegetation interaction, conservation biology, legal issues related to climate change, environmental communication and environmental education. I am the George W.

My research focuses on biodiversity and arthropod-mediated ecosystem services in rural and urban agriculture. I also work on spatial ecology of the coffee agroecosystem and am interested more broadly on the links between small-scale sustainable agriculture, biodiversity and food sovereignty. My recent research is related to ecosystem services in agroforestry systems in Mexico and Puerto Rico. In Mexico my lab is investigating how local level multi-species interactions generate autonomous pest control in agroecosystems using coffee agroforests as a model system.

We are also interested in critical transitions within the pest systems in coffee. In collaboration with John Vandermeer University of Michigan and Stacy Philpott University of California-Santa Cruz I established a hectare plot in a shaded organic coffee farm in Chiapas, Mexico, and am conducting research on complex ecological interactions among pests, diseases and natural enemies.

This project also investigates how ecosystem services coffee and food provisioning, conservation of biodiversity, pest control, pollination and carbon storate respond to local and landscape level factors. After Hurricane Maria, we started a research project examining the resistance and resilience of coffee agroecosystems in the central mountainous region of Puerto Rico. We are also investigating the potential impact of the biochar generated through the gasification process on soil properties, plant growth and crop yield.

In my courses I like to challenge students to think for themselves. Most of my courses are interdisciplinary and are taught from a social justice perspective. I teach undergraduate courses in sustainable development and globalization, and the agroecology and political ecology of food systems, a graduate course in field ecology, a graduate course in diverse farming systems, and graduate seminars on topics that range from conservation in fragmented habitats to food sovereignty. As a multidisciplinary scholar, with degrees in engineering and social science, Assistant Professor Reames' research agenda seeks to connect the areas of technological advancement, the policy process, and social equity.

He is currently exploring disparities in residential energy generation, consumption, and affordability- focusing on the production and persistence of inequality by race, class, and place. Catherine Riseng, PhD, is an Assistant Research Scientist and aquatic ecologist with specific focus on fluvial ecosystems and benthic invertebrate ecology. She is interested in assessing and understanding the effects of human landscape alteration on river and lake ecosystems.

Her work has included landscape-based models of riverine condition using biological indicators and regression-based models that predict expected condition for rivers of Michigan and Wisconsin. She has also led development of a large geo-spatial database and classification framework, the Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Framework. Professor Seelbach's experiences bridge the academic study of aquatic ecosystems to its application across a range of resource management agencies. He has helped with major initiatives regarding watershed assessment and management, ecological flows and water allocation policy, water resources monitoring, coastal zone management, and revitalization of Areas of Concern.

Regarding science, Paul applies a landscape-ecology approach to understanding the structure and function of riverine and nearshore ecosystems. He is interested in system elements such as: spatial heterogeneity and context, scales and hierarchy, driving processes, and the human footprint. Regarding aquatic practice, Paul is interested in promoting effective knowledge transfer to management and governance decision processes and in nurturing development of professional and leadership skills.

Sam Stolper is an environmental and energy economist. His research, teaching, and writing are aimed at the design and implementation of environmental policy that is both efficient and equitable.

Search form

He received a Ph. Professor Taylor's research interests include urban agriculture, food access, and food insecurity; institutional diversity; analysis of the composition of the environmental workforce; social movement analysis; environmental justice; leisure and natural resource use; poverty; and race, gender, and ethnic relations. Her current research includes an assessment of food access in Michigan and other parts of the country. Within this growing body of interdisciplinary work, he leverages social theory, big data, machine learning, spatial-temporal computer modeling e.

This work addresses critical domains including i landscape management e. He is a conservation ornithologist and an evolutionary ecologist who studies the assembly of biological communities, and how different assembly histories can impact biotic responses to global change. He integrates his training in systematics and community ecology to examine community-level biotic responses to global change.

In his research, he asks whether differences in the assembly histories of communities have altered their ecologies, with a focus on their vulnerability. She is interested in the structure of policy and administrative processes that promote the sustainability of ecological and human systems in the face of diverse yet legitimate interests, scientific complexity, and often conflicting and ambiguous legal direction.

Wondolleck has spent over 30 years examining the emergence and functioning of inter-organizational and community-based collaborative processes in ecosystem-scale resource planning and management. This research looks at both conflict and collaboration in the management of public natural resources and, in particular, the factors that promote and sustain collaborative resource management processes over time. Current research projects include: assessing lessons for policy and practice from marine and coastal ecosystem-based management initiatives around the world; understanding the factors that enable resilience of local communities; examining effective end user engagement in collaborative science; and, advancing understanding of the connections between the factors that encourage and sustain collaborative ecosystem management initiatives and the institutional arrangements that might better enable community-level adaptation to the effects of climate change.

His research focuses on the broad fields of sustainable engineering and industrial ecology.

Sarah Bates

He received the Robert A. Professor Yaffee's research focuses on collaborative decision making on complex environmental and sustainability choices, including the ways that traditional political processes and organizations function, and how new collaborative structures can be developed to encourage more effective decision making. He is particularly interested in landscape-scale conservation and sustainable natural resource management, and how decision-making institutions can be encouraged to take on an ecosystem-scale perspective. Of particular interest is policy involving biological diversity, public lands, marine and coastal ecosystems and energy.

Yaffee's research and teaching draws from substantial on-the-ground work with nonprofit organizations and charitable foundations in facilitating dispute resolution and collaborative problem-solving processes, and in helping them develop monitoring, evaluation and adaptive management strategies.

He is committed to professional education at SEAS and teaches skill-building courses in political and institutional analysis, negotiation and mediation. His research investigates links between the composition and function of soil microbial communities and the influence of microbial activity on ecosystem-level processes. This work draws on ecology, microbiology, and biochemistry and is focused at several scales of understanding, ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem scale. Current research centers on understanding the link between plant and microbial activity within terrestrial ecosystems, and the influence climate change may have on these dynamics.

Teaching includes courses in soil ecology and ecosystem ecology. MEERA provides environmental educators with resources to conduct and improve evaluations of their programs. Zint conducts on-going research on predicting responsible environmental behavior. Skip to main content. SEAS Faculty. Jose F. Rosina Bierbaum Professor Environmental Policy and Planning, Sustainable Systems, Climate and Energy Professor and Dean Emerita Bierbaum, PhD, focuses her research on the interface of science and policy--principally on issues related to climate change adaptation and mitigation at the national and international levels.

Jennifer Blesh Assistant Professor Conservation Ecology, Food As a broadly trained agroecologist, Jennifer Blesh, PhD, uses interdisciplinary research approaches to understand how different agrifood systems impact ecological and social processes. Bradley J. Cardinale Professor; Director, Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research CIGLR Conservation Ecology Professor Cardinale is an ecologist who uses mathematical models, novel experiments, observational studies and meta-analyses to examine how human activities impact biological diversity, and to predict how changes in biodiversity affect the goods and services ecosystems provide to humanity.

Rebecca D.

Women and Leadership 12222

Sara Hughes Assistant Professor Climate and Energy, Water, Cities, the Built Environment, and Mobility Professor Hughes' research focuses on the political and institutional dimensions of sustainable and equitable water and climate change policies, primarily in the urban context.

Meha Jain Assistant Professor Environmental Informatics, Environmental Justice, Climate and Energy, Food Assistant Professor Jain's research examines the impacts of environmental change on agricultural production, and strategies that farmers may adopt to reduce negative impacts. Stan Jones Associate Professor Landscape Architecture Associate Professor Jones' work focuses upon the issues of inclusive design and social justice and how they impact both design processes and the physical places we help to create.

Greg Keoleian Peter M. Bulkley Collegiate Professor of Sustainable Systems; U-M Distinguished Faculty Fellow in Sustainability Sustainable Systems Professor Miller's research uses life cycle assessment and scenario modeling to identify environmental problems before they occur. Michael R. Jonathan T. Overpeck, Ph. Samuel A. Graham Dean; William B. Tony Reames Assistant Professor Environmental Justice, Environmental Policy and Planning, Sustainable Systems, Climate and Energy As a multidisciplinary scholar, with degrees in engineering and social science, Assistant Professor Reames' research agenda seeks to connect the areas of technological advancement, the policy process, and social equity.

Paul Seelbach Professor of Practice Conservation Ecology, Water Professor Seelbach's experiences bridge the academic study of aquatic ecosystems to its application across a range of resource management agencies. Dorceta E.

WATER our most precious resource

Taylor James E. Crowfoot Collegiate Professor; Director of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Environmental Justice, Environmental Policy and Planning, Food Professor Taylor's research interests include urban agriculture, food access, and food insecurity; institutional diversity; analysis of the composition of the environmental workforce; social movement analysis; environmental justice; leisure and natural resource use; poverty; and race, gender, and ethnic relations. Julia M. Steven L. Yaffee Professor Behavior, Education and Communication, Conservation Ecology, Environmental Policy and Planning Professor Yaffee's research focuses on collaborative decision making on complex environmental and sustainability choices, including the ways that traditional political processes and organizations function, and how new collaborative structures can be developed to encourage more effective decision making.